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                    [post_content] => Understanding Blockchain Technology

Blockchain technology has gained popularity in recent years as a disruptive force that has the potential to revolutionize various industries. While it was initially associated with digital currencies like Bitcoin, the applications of blockchain extend far beyond that. In this article, we will delve into the practical applications of blockchain for businesses, shedding light on its transformative potential and providing insights for enterprises looking to leverage this innovative technology.

Before diving into its applications, let's briefly explore what blockchain technology entails. At its core, a blockchain is a decentralized and distributed ledger that records transactions across multiple computers in a secure and transparent manner. Each transaction, or "block," is cryptographically linked to the preceding one, forming a chronological chain of data blocks. This inherent transparency and immutability make blockchain an ideal solution for various business applications.

Practical Applications for Businesses
  1. Supply Chain Management: One of the most prominent use cases for blockchain in business is supply chain management. By utilizing blockchain technology, enterprises can enhance transparency and traceability across their supply chains. Every step of the supply chain, from raw material sourcing to product delivery, can be recorded on the blockchain, providing stakeholders with real-time visibility into the movement of goods. This not only reduces the risk of counterfeit products but also streamlines processes and enhances trust among partners.
  2. Identity Verification: Blockchain technology offers a secure and decentralized solution for identity verification and authentication. Instead of relying on centralized databases vulnerable to hacking and data breaches, businesses can leverage blockchain-based identity platforms to verify the identity of customers, employees, and partners securely. This can streamline onboarding processes, prevent identity theft, and ensure compliance with regulations such as GDPR.
  3. Smart Contracts: Smart contracts are self-executing contracts with the terms of the agreement directly written into code. By utilizing blockchain technology, businesses can automate the execution of contractual agreements, thereby reducing the need for intermediaries and minimizing the risk of disputes. Smart contracts can be employed in various industries, including real estate, insurance, and legal services, to streamline processes and improve efficiency.
Implementation Strategies While the potential benefits of blockchain technology for businesses are undeniable, successful implementation requires careful planning and execution. Here are some key strategies to consider: Conclusion In conclusion, blockchain technology holds immense promise for businesses across various industries. By leveraging its transparent, decentralized, and immutable nature, enterprises can streamline processes, enhance security, and unlock new opportunities for innovation. However, successful implementation requires a strategic approach and a deep understanding of the technology's capabilities and limitations. [post_title] => Practical Applications of Blockchain for Businesses [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => practical-applications-of-blockchain-for-businesses [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-06-06 11:28:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-06-06 15:28:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://par5.io/?p=2349 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2295 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2024-02-21 12:06:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2024-02-21 17:06:08 [post_content] =>

In pursuing an agile transformation, CEOs and CIOs can find common ground in five IT shifts that can enable traditional players to compete with digital disrupters.

The rise of digital companies over the past 20 years has forced traditional players across industries to radically rethink their operating models—for greater speed, customer experience, and flexibility. Indeed, while incumbents are struggling with existing processes and technology to adapt their offerings and provide digital services, new digital players can quickly offer mobile-first services, which take a couple of minutes and a few clicks to, for example, open a bank account or set up home internet. Over the past five years, many companies across industries have started to experiment with the benefits of agility—and some of them (banks, telecoms, retailers, and other companies) have even made the move toward enterprise agility, which is based on creating fluid organizations that continually evolve to capture market opportunities while highly engaging their employees. The benefits are straightforward: companies that successfully embrace enterprise agility can improve financial performance by 20–30 percent, according to Par5 research. This performance is underpinned by a 30–50 percent improvement in operational performance, a customer satisfaction score boost of 10–30 points, and a boost in employee engagement score of 20–30 points. Combined with their existing experience and client base, this enhanced performance in turn helps traditional companies catch up and compete effectively with digital disrupters. Successful agile organizations—of any size and across industries—take a similar approach to five key elements: strategy, structure, process, people, and technology. And while many companies successfully tackle the first four elements, they often still struggle with technology. In this article, we discuss the common challenges of achieving enterprise agility through the lens of IT and outline five shifts that CEOs and chief information officers (CIOs) can make together to get on the right track, increase the speed of IT by up to ten times, and reduce IT costs to match the level achieved by digital leaders.

Five IT shifts to achieve enterprise agility

Five shifts are required to compete with digital natives: creating truly cross-functional teams with co-leadership of business and IT, decoupling core systems, nurturing engineering talent, automating software delivery, and adopting cloud infrastructure (Exhibit 1). Each of the shifts contributes to enterprise agility through specific business outcomes, addressing objectives of both the CEO and CIO: speed of delivery, customer experience, quality, productivity, and total cost of ownership 5 core it shifts for agile companies

Shift #1: Collaboration: From siloed IT department to cross-functional agile teams

A common complaint among CEOs is that the IT department is like a black hole; they see delayed projects and overrun budgets, and it can be a struggle to measure IT productivity. On the flip side, CIOs note that the business often throws an endless string of new requirements over the fence that IT doesn’t have capacity to deliver, let alone manage the corresponding technical debt. In traditional structures, the process of defining and aligning business and IT requirements can take three to six months before the first line of code is even written. Overcoming this dichotomy requires shifting the collaboration model away from an isolated IT department and toward cross-functional teams that contain a mix of business-line and IT professionals. By achieving missions with as few handovers as possible, these teams are crucial to increasing the speed of development, launch, and feedback integration. At the core of this model are “BizDevOps” teams of five to nine people that have all the required skills to deliver a mission: business, developing and testing, and site reliability engineering (Exhibit 2). Business team members include product owners, product experts, and customer experience experts who drive product needs based on the voice of the customer and ROI. Engineers drive production of shippable software on a daily basis, as well as automation to release and operate reliably in production. Daily interaction allows the team to reduce requirements alignment time from months to days or even hours, radically reducing time to market and the need for communicating through bureaucracy. In practice, these BizDevOps teams work in parallel to support different areas of the business. Take examples of multiple European and Asian banks and telecom operators that have established a large number of these teams that ladder up into “teams of teams” known as “tribes.” In these companies, segment tribes bundle products for specific business segments and support commercial activities, while product tribes develop product features and product-specific customer journeys. To counterbalance the autonomy of the segment and product tribes and to preserve architectural consistency and IT cost efficiency, companies also establish platform tribes that deliver common services, providing reusable components to facilitate the work of engineers in business tribes. Examples include cybersecurity-as-a-service, infrastructure-as-a-service, and data-as-a-service tribes that provide automated self-service tools, as well as core IT tribes that hold complex legacy systems that span multiple tribes and can’t (yet) be distributed. In many cases, the tribes absorb the entire IT staff and take ownership of IT systems, and the traditional IT department ceases to exist. However, the need—and responsibility of the CIO—remains to supervise technical debt and the technical quality of delivery and uptime, as well as attract and develop IT talent. To achieve a balance, companies can ensure each tribe has both a business lead (“mini CEO”) and an IT lead (“mini CIO”). Often, the business-tribe leads report to the head of business (typically an executive committee member such as the chief commercial officer), and the IT leads report to the CIO, ensuring a level of control and accountability by the CIO.

Shift #2: Applications and services: From a monolith IT core to granular applications and services isolated by APIs and owned by teams of teams

Monolithic, “all-in-one” IT systems are a thing of the past; today’s IT systems need to be granular enough to evolve independently on a daily basis. Traditionally, core systems—such as core banking systems in banks and business support systems in telecom—have been the hub for a multitude of functionalities, all tied inside one application or several interconnected monolith applications with a spaghetti-like array of interconnections. While this structure has some scale and computation-speed advantages, a change in one functionality typically causes the need to perform regression testing on all the other functionalities to make sure nothing is broken. Furthermore, many of the affected systems from the 1990s and 2000s were optimized for brick-and-mortar retail channels or even back-office functions, leaving out mobile, web, partner API, and other digital channels that have appeared since then and increased complexity. For example, at one bank, changing a tariff or creating a new product required changes in up to 30 systems, which led to parallel developments in several departments and weeks of regression testing to find flaws in each of them. Replacements of such core systems have always been associated with significant cost—to the tune of €50 million to more than €500 million over a multiyear program. But that’s not necessarily the best path forward for all companies. Instead, the pressure to deliver great customer experiences while spending money wisely has led a number of agile companies to adopt the “Strangler pattern.” This approach involves selecting the most frequently changing functionalities (such as loan-origination journeys, product catalogs or tariff modules, scoring engines, data models, or customer-facing journeys), assigning ownership for these functionalities to business or platform tribes, and setting up dedicated BizDevOps teams to create granular and specialized services (often called microservices). These services follow a “one service–one function” principle, carving out what doesn’t belong in legacy systems and leaving a leaner core (Exhibit 3). At its base, this approach cuts down on the time to develop and revise functionalities, reducing total cost of ownership.

Shift #3: Sourcing and people: From outsourcing IT to strategic IT hiring balanced with partners and vendors

Many large, incumbent companies outsource a huge amount of their IT—if not all of it—partly for cost reasons, and partly due to a struggle to lure the right talent away from more compelling disrupters and digital natives. It’s little wonder, then, that vendors are proliferating and offering a new range of opportunities to help CIOs circumvent their talent-sourcing challenge. However, companies that embrace enterprise agility cannot lean too hard on vendors and partners to provide turnkey IT services. In this world, the paradigm of fully outsourcing IT to a vendor and submitting requests for a needed change is slow and no longer suitable due to rapidly shifting needs. Competing with digital natives requires daily testing of minimum viable products (MVPs) and leaves little room for handovers—be it between departments within a company or with outside vendors. Furthermore, it requires continual renewal of technologies as development frameworks, libraries, and patterns evolve every year. One CEO was shocked when he learned that there were only about 100 people in the entire job market whose resumes indicated they were capable of working with its legacy, vendor-based core system, compared with thousands who could work with open-source technologies. These needs are much easier to meet with internal talent embedded in core teams. To address its talent needs, one European bank completely revamped its IT workforce by identifying the engineers who were actually coding and radically increasing the share of coders from around 10 percent to 80 percent. It also mapped all engineers on a capability scale (from novice to expert, on a scale of 1 to 5) and focused on creating a diamond-shaped talent composition. This configuration increased the share of its IT workforce that qualifies as expert or advanced engineers (the middle of the diamond) and who are exponentially more productive but not exponentially more expensive than less experienced engineers. The result was a total refresh of its approximately 2,000 full-time-equivalent (FTE) IT workforce, with the experienced engineer population making up 80 percent of the head count and achieving cost savings of 40 percent. An international telecom company internalized hundreds of engineers, mostly by insourcing but also by offering individual engineers or even vendor companies time-and-material B2B contracts. Another international bank internalized several thousand engineers, built a talent ecosystem with vendors and cloud providers to attract younger and scarcer talent, and launched reskilling initiatives to upskill more than 6,000 developers and architects. Vendors, for their part, are also adapting and finding new ways to cooperate. On one hand, they offer more API-accessible software-as-a-service (SaaS) and platform-as-a-service (PaaS) solutions that offer specific turnkey functionalities that can be consumed off the shelf. On the other hand, companies provide highly specialized and experienced talent on demand—such as through strategic partnerships—offering alternatives to the typical vendor bundle, which includes novice employees.

Shift #4: Delivery process: From waterfall processes to continuous delivery

The speed of delivery is a constant source of debate between CEOs and CIOs; CEOs tend to become frustrated by the time that it takes a traditional organization to get through all the steps of waterfall delivery, but CIOs caution that going faster can lead to production incidents. While an average company is able to release three to four major upgrades of functionality per year and faster ones reach ten to 12, digital-native companies such as Amazon, Google, and most digital start-ups can release at virtually any time as needed—weekly, daily, or hourly. This allows digital natives to A/B test different versions of the same functionality with different clients, test MVPs any time, incorporate customer feedback at pace, and continually evolve the business, reaching a true level of agility. Several traditional banks and telecoms in Europe and Asia followed this path and reach as many as 20,000 releases per quarter, even on back-end systems. Speeding up delivery does not require a trade-off with quality. Getting competent engineers working on autonomous microservices unlocks the true power of continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD). The secret to making this shift lies in automating tasks to enable frequent incremental releases (Exhibit 4). And all stages of delivering a service, from coding to testing to deployment, are automated, including security testing in the DevOps pipelines—what is commonly referred to as DevSecOps. An advanced international bank went a step further and created an internal platform as a service for developers. Each developer could access templates of services through a global portal and automatically access required infrastructure, CI/CD pipeline, security tooling, and API definition with a click of a button. This enabled developers to focus on coding actual business functionalities rather than wasting time on setting up pipelines and infrastructure configurations.

Shift #5: Infrastructure: From physical infrastructure to cloud, containers, and infrastructure as code

Finally, no discussion of deploying technology in an agile enterprise would be complete without mentioning cloud infrastructure—public, private, or hybrid. Similar to automation, cloud infrastructure allows companies to obtain computing and storage capacity on demand, skipping bureaucratic procedures and spending seconds provisioning an environment instead of waiting for weeks. As our previous research has shown, nearly 80 percent of enterprises have already been planning to put at least 10 percent of their workloads in the public cloud over the next three years. Several banks and telecoms in Europe and Russia have moved their production and testing loads to cloud providers. For example, one Western European bank uses the cloud’s flexible capacity for hosting testing environments, an Eastern European bank uses it to host testing and production environments for selected apps and customer journeys in compliance with federal laws, and a European telecom has its entire API layer in the cloud. Most advanced companies use the infrastructure-as-code concept to obtain capacity through an API, directly requesting additional environments from the software rather than through physical hardware configurations. An IT infrastructure tribe is typically responsible for this. When deployed alongside CI/CD, cloud infrastructure has proven to radically improve several key IT metrics—mostly by eliminating wait time and reworking as well as demand forecasts. For example, companies have been able to compress cycle time by implementing standardized processes and automation and accelerate software deployments and testing. Some teams that used to spend two days per sprint on regression testing can now perform the same task in just two hours. In addition to improving productivity, companies can also significantly reduce IT overhead costs by optimizing IT asset usage as well as improving the overall flexibility of IT in meeting business needs. Indeed, cloud providers are increasingly offering much more sophisticated solutions than basic computing and storage, such as big-data and machine-learning services. Cloud infrastructure and CI/CD have also been seen to accelerate time to market and increase the quality of service through the “self-healing” nature of standard solutions—for example, automatically allocating more storage to a database approaching capacity.

In Conclusion...

Taken together, these five shifts can provide myriad improvements that build on companies’ efforts to address the strategy, structure, process, and people aspects of enterprise agility. A cross-functional organization structure allows for shorter communication flows, resulting in greater speed. More independent and specialized services; automated tools for developing, testing, and deploying software; and cloud infrastructure enable faster releases. And a highly skilled internal IT workforce fosters efficiency, institutional knowledge, and healthier vendor relationships. Each of these factors contributes to reducing total cost of ownership, freeing up capital for reinvestment or outright cost reduction. In pilots, some of these benefits can be evident in as little as 12 weeks. Without a doubt, these benefits justify an inquiry into the feasibility and cost of their application in any organization.
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In the current digital era, a user-friendly experience is no longer just a "nice-to-have" feature, it has become a basic requirement. This is where UX design plays a crucial role, ensuring smooth interaction between users and the product. However, with so many best practices and guidelines available, it can be daunting to know where to begin. In this context, let's explore some fundamental principles that are further enhanced by the burgeoning field of AI.

1. User-Centricity at the Core:

Remember, it's all about the user. To create a user-centered design, it is essential to conduct thorough user research to gain a deep understanding of their needs, motivations, and pain points. One effective way to do this is by creating empathy maps and user personas. However, to gain even deeper insights, AI tools can be used to analyze user behavior data. By identifying hidden patterns and preferences, designers can make more informed and targeted design decisions, ultimately creating a better user experience.

2. Intuitive Navigation & Micro-interactions:

When it comes to designing a user-friendly interface, one of the key elements is navigation. Users should be able to find what they are looking for without having to struggle or consult a map. To achieve this, it's important to anticipate their next steps and provide clear visual cues to guide them along the way. Additionally, micro interactions play an important role in enhancing the user experience. These are small, subtle animations or feedback mechanisms that provide users with a sense of delight and satisfaction. From a user's perspective, these interactions can make a big difference in how they perceive and interact with a website or application. With the help of AI, designers can test various navigation structures and micro interactions with real users to understand how they are perceived and to optimize user flow. This data-driven approach can provide valuable insights into what works and what doesn't, ultimately leading to a more intuitive and effortless user experience.

3. Accessibility for All:

When designing a website or any digital product, it is essential to ensure that it is inclusive and accessible to everyone, regardless of their ability. This means that the design should follow the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and employ assistive technologies that make it easier for people with disabilities to use the product. AI can be a valuable asset in ensuring that a design is accessible. Automated accessibility scans and testing tools use AI to identify and address potential barriers that might make the product inaccessible to certain users. By leveraging AI-powered tools, designers can quickly and efficiently test their designs, identify any issues, and make the necessary changes to ensure that the product is accessible to everyone. Incorporating accessibility into the design process not only makes it easier for people with disabilities to use the product, but it also improves the user experience for everyone. By making your design more inclusive and accessible, you are ensuring that everyone can participate and benefit from your product, regardless of their ability.

4. Consistent Visual Hierarchy & Style:

Maintain a consistent visual hierarchy and style throughout the interface. This creates a sense of familiarity and reduces cognitive load. Utilize design systems to ensure consistency across elements. AI can play a role in analyzing your existing design language and suggesting AI-powered design tweaks for optimal cohesion.

5. A/B Testing & Continuous Improvement:

Never stop iterating! Use A/B testing to compare different design elements and see what resonates with users. Gather user feedback and continuously refine your design based on data and feedback. AI-powered user testing tools can streamline this process, providing valuable insights quickly and efficiently.

[post_title] => Crafting a Seamless User Experience(UX) Design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => crafting-a-seamless-ux-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-06-06 10:58:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-06-06 14:58:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://par5.io/?p=2277 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2274 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2024-02-20 15:43:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2024-02-20 20:43:41 [post_content] => The field of content creation is currently witnessing a major shift, as generative AI gains popularity as a powerful tool for reshaping the process. With its intelligent algorithms, this technology is revolutionizing the way we create content, whether it be by generating compelling copy or producing lifelike images. As a result, the possibilities for content creation are expanding, promising to open up new opportunities for creators and businesses alike. Generative AI is an innovative technology that has the potential to revolutionize the way we create content. With the help of complex algorithms and vast datasets, these tools can autonomously produce creative content in various forms such as written text, social media posts, and even stunning visuals. This technology has the potential to eliminate writer's block and make content creation faster and more efficient. The possibilities are endless, and it's exciting to see how generative AI will continue to evolve and improve in the future. While the rapid production of content is undoubtedly a game-changer, generative AI's value extends far beyond efficiency. These tools can boost creativity by analyzing patterns and styles, suggesting innovative concepts and unexpected approaches, sparking ideas that even seasoned creators might miss. They can also personalize experiences by tailoring content to individual preferences and demographics, delivering highly relevant and engaging experiences for each user. Additionally, AI-powered translation tools can instantly convert content into multiple languages, exponentially expanding your reach and impact.

The Potential of Generative Ai

It is essential to remember that human creativity is still at the heart of the creative process. Generative AI excels at automation, data analysis, and pattern recognition, but it lacks the nuanced understanding of human emotions, experiences, and cultural context that are crucial for truly impactful content. The future of content creation lies in a harmonious collaboration between human and machine intelligence. Humans will provide the strategic vision, emotional intelligence, and editorial oversight, while AI will handle the heavy lifting of content generation, optimization, and personalization. This partnership will unlock possibilities beyond our imagination, leading to a new era of richer, more engaging, and impactful content experiences. [post_title] => How Generative AI is Changing Content Creation [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-generative-ai-is-changing-content [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-06-06 10:55:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-06-06 14:55:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://par5.io/?p=2274 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 4 [current_post] => -1 [before_loop] => 1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2349 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2024-02-26 12:49:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2024-02-26 17:49:27 [post_content] => Understanding Blockchain Technology Blockchain technology has gained popularity in recent years as a disruptive force that has the potential to revolutionize various industries. While it was initially associated with digital currencies like Bitcoin, the applications of blockchain extend far beyond that. In this article, we will delve into the practical applications of blockchain for businesses, shedding light on its transformative potential and providing insights for enterprises looking to leverage this innovative technology. Before diving into its applications, let's briefly explore what blockchain technology entails. At its core, a blockchain is a decentralized and distributed ledger that records transactions across multiple computers in a secure and transparent manner. Each transaction, or "block," is cryptographically linked to the preceding one, forming a chronological chain of data blocks. This inherent transparency and immutability make blockchain an ideal solution for various business applications. Practical Applications for Businesses
  1. Supply Chain Management: One of the most prominent use cases for blockchain in business is supply chain management. By utilizing blockchain technology, enterprises can enhance transparency and traceability across their supply chains. Every step of the supply chain, from raw material sourcing to product delivery, can be recorded on the blockchain, providing stakeholders with real-time visibility into the movement of goods. This not only reduces the risk of counterfeit products but also streamlines processes and enhances trust among partners.
  2. Identity Verification: Blockchain technology offers a secure and decentralized solution for identity verification and authentication. Instead of relying on centralized databases vulnerable to hacking and data breaches, businesses can leverage blockchain-based identity platforms to verify the identity of customers, employees, and partners securely. This can streamline onboarding processes, prevent identity theft, and ensure compliance with regulations such as GDPR.
  3. Smart Contracts: Smart contracts are self-executing contracts with the terms of the agreement directly written into code. By utilizing blockchain technology, businesses can automate the execution of contractual agreements, thereby reducing the need for intermediaries and minimizing the risk of disputes. Smart contracts can be employed in various industries, including real estate, insurance, and legal services, to streamline processes and improve efficiency.
Implementation Strategies While the potential benefits of blockchain technology for businesses are undeniable, successful implementation requires careful planning and execution. Here are some key strategies to consider: Conclusion In conclusion, blockchain technology holds immense promise for businesses across various industries. By leveraging its transparent, decentralized, and immutable nature, enterprises can streamline processes, enhance security, and unlock new opportunities for innovation. However, successful implementation requires a strategic approach and a deep understanding of the technology's capabilities and limitations. [post_title] => Practical Applications of Blockchain for Businesses [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => practical-applications-of-blockchain-for-businesses [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-06-06 11:28:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-06-06 15:28:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://par5.io/?p=2349 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 4 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => 1 [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => c1470b1be310c80ccd52748bed93aee6 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [allow_query_attachment_by_filename:protected] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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